Author Archives: Va

Plant Fuzz Plugs & Anthidium

What’s white, furry, sits in a bee block, and looks like a joke? An Anthidium nest plug made from Plant Fuzz! Seriously, it looks like someone stuffed a cotton ball into the nesting tunnel(s). Well, someone – or something – … Continue reading

Posted in 2015, Nest Plugs, Plugs and Bugs | Leave a comment

Colorado’s “newest” bee

Megachile apicalis, a species introduced from Europe and a close relative of the alfalfa leaf-cutting bee, has made its way to Colorado, and what a stunner she is!  We reared this bee from one of The Bees’ Needs 2013 bee … Continue reading

Posted in 2013, Bee Blocks, Nest Plugs, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Resin Plugs (part 1) and their Bugs

Some of the best nest plugs in the bug business are made of sticky plant sap–as it dries, it hardens into a protective door and can stand on its own or be topped off with debris.  Today we’ll cover two … Continue reading

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Mud Plugs (part 1) and their Bugs

Mud is used to plug the nests of many wasps and some bee species, including our earliest nesting bee, Osmia lignaria. Mud plugs are a complex set of plugs, with subtle differences that we are starting to understand. For this … Continue reading

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Spring 2015 has Sprung

Welcome to 2015! The Osmia lignaria are flying early this year. If you already have your bee block, make sure it goes up soon, since female O. lignaria are now looking for places to nest. If you’ve registered for a … Continue reading

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Seeing Bee Blocks on Open Space?

Yep, you’re not imagining things. During 2014, City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks partnered up with us to place bee blocks at various trailheads. In the 40 nesting blocks that were placed at 30 trailheads, data on 763 … Continue reading

Posted in 2014, Bee Blocks | Leave a comment

Happy Groundhog Day 2015

Since Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow today, it looks like our baby bees and wasps can have 6 more weeks in their cocoons. During the winter months, your bees and wasps are in diapause. Most of them spend the winter … Continue reading

Posted in 2015, Bee Blocks | Leave a comment